The SIG-III Blog

Notes from the ASIS&T special interest group in international information

Archive for August 2006

How do we define trust?

What are the key elements of any definition of trust? Also, why talk about it? Why should we as information professionals take an interest (or not take an interest) in discussing trust in information?

Here is an article discussing how trust may be defined:

Grandison, T., and Sloman, M. 2001. A Survey of Trust in Internet Applications. IEEE Communications Surveys and Tutorials.

Written by sigiii

August 21, 2006 at 2:33 am

Posted in 2006 Global Plaza

How do we measure trust?

How can a person’s trust in information best be measured?

Here is an article to help guide discussion:

Manchala D. W. Trust metrics, models and protocols for electronic commerce transactions, in 18th International Conference on Distributed Computing Systems, IEEE, 1998.

Written by sigiii

August 21, 2006 at 2:33 am

Posted in 2006 Global Plaza

Which aspects of trust are most significant?

Even a casual review of the literature on trust reveals a cacophony of issues on the subject. From the list below, which one to three issues would you consider most significant
– to you as an information professional
– to you as a consumer of information
when evaluating a website? Why?

– The privacy policy maintained by a website that asks for personal information
– The presence of a logo from a third party organization certifying a site is trustworthy, such as Verisign
– The interests of an electronic retailer in mining data on the information behavior of visitors to its own website
– The interests of an electronic retailer in monitoring data on the information behavior of Internet users in general
– The influence of the blogosphere on a public’s willingness to trust a piece of information
– The environment rich with personal data created by social networking sites such as MySpace, Xanga, Friendster, or LinkedIn
– How perceptions of trust change from culture to culture

Here are some articles relating to this question:

Shanker, L. 2006. In Google we Trust. First Monday, v. 11: 4.

Wakefield, R., and Whitten, D. 2006. Examining User Perceptions of Third Party Organization Credibility and Trust in an E-retailer. Journal of Organizational and End User Computing, v. 18: 2.

Holland C. P. and Lockett A. G. Business trust and the formation of virtual organizations, in 31st Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, IEEE, 1998, Hawaii.

Gefen, D., Rose, G.M., Warkentin, M., Pavlou, P.A. 2005. Cultural Diversity and Trust in IT Adoption: A Comparison of Potential e-Voters in the USA and South Africa. Journal of Global Information Management, v. 13: 1.

Written by sigiii

August 21, 2006 at 2:33 am

Posted in 2006 Global Plaza

e-commerce and data mining

Should online retailers or search engines be deterred from mining usage data from their websites, or from monitoring trends in how Internet users are using the Internet as a whole? Are there benefits to allowing an online retailers or search engine to mine data? If so, how far should these sites be allowed to go in terms of collecting personal data? When should they be required to stop?

Here are some articles relating to this discussion:

Wakefield, R., and Whitten, D. 2006. Examining User Perceptions of Third Party Organization Credibility and Trust in an E-retailer. Journal of Organizational and End User Computing, v. 18: 2.

Clark T. H. and Ho G. L. Electronic intermediaries: trust building and market differentiation, in 32nd Annual Hawaii International Conference on Systems Sciences, IEEE, 1999, Hawaii.

Written by sigiii

August 21, 2006 at 2:29 am

Government surveillance

Is it acceptable for a government to monitor channels of digital information, including personal information, that pass within its borders? If a government has a legitimate interest in doing so, how may it build trust among its citizens that it is not unnecessarily monitoring their communications or collecting their personal information? When should a government have its powers in this regard limited?

In the case of the current wiretapping operatings in the U.S. (outlined in this article by Dan Mitchell in The New York Times), to what extent should people around the world be concerned that the U.S. Government may be monitoring their Internet communications?

(The NY times requires a login to read their articles online. Creating a login and password for the NY Times is free and may be done here).

Written by sigiii

August 21, 2006 at 2:29 am

Government censorship

Should a government be allowed to (try to) censor information that its citizens receive? Are there circumstances under which this practice should be considered explicitly acceptable or explicitly unacceptable?

Written by sigiii

August 21, 2006 at 2:26 am